Should you sign an employment contract?

So, you think you’ve found your dream job and you can’t wait to get started – congratulations! Now all that’s left to do is sign the employment contract. Well, not so fast. Before you sign anything, there are a few things you should be on the lookout for. Otherwise, you may be seeking the advice of employment lawyers in Bournemouth when things go wrong.

* Start and end dates: If this is a contract or temporary position, end dates should be clearly defined. Regardless of the type of employment, your start date should be stated.

* Cause for termination: To protect both the company and yourself, causes for termination should be listed. These can include theft, incompetence, harassment of other employees, and other criteria.

* Compensation and benefits: How much are you going to get paid for doing your job? Is this a salary position or an hourly wage? What is the expectation of overtime? What benefits, if any, are included in your employment agreement?

* Job description: What is your role within the company? Read this section carefully to ensure that the job description is in line with your expectations. If you have questions, ask before you sign the agreement.

* Moonlighting: Some companies have strict policies regarding moonlighting; if you plan on having a second job, this section should be clearly defined. Watch for non-compete clauses, which may prevent you from working for a competitor, both during your employment and for a period after you leave the company.

You have the right to take the agreement and peruse it at your leisure before you sign it. Employment lawyers in Bournemouth can look it over and answer specific questions you have, or advise you on what sections should be negotiated. Most employers are honest and have their employees’ best interest in mind; but it doesn’t hurt to ensure that you are protected from unscrupulous corporations.

A C Employment Solicitors Limited offers expert, independent advice to businesses and individuals on all aspects of Employment Law.

Shares